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Unusual Mediastinal Tumors Including Castleman’s Disease

Ching Yeung, Sudhir R. Sundaresan
Unusual Mediastinal Tumors Including Castleman’s Disease is a topic covered in the Pearson's General Thoracic.

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Key Points

  • This chapter will discuss mesenchymal tumors, primary mediastinal carcinoma, and Castleman’s Disease, all rare tumours not covered elsewhere in the book
  • Literature is largely based on case reports and case series
  • Castleman’s disease is perhaps the most frequently seen of these rare mediastinal tumours in adults
  • There is no universally accepted classification system; however, we offer in Table 1 an attempt to unify and summarize the available information about this heterogeneous collection of lesions.
  • CT or MRI may be useful in diagnosis. However, tissue diagnosis is often required to make the definitive diagnosis.
  • Resection is the treatment of choice as chemotherapy and radiation are often not effective.
  • In occasional cases it is wise to onsider pre-operative embolization for some solitary fibrous tumors, hemangiomas and Castleman’s disease.
  • Prognosis is variable and dependent on histology and completeness of resection.

-- To view the remaining sections of this topic, please or --

Key Points

  • This chapter will discuss mesenchymal tumors, primary mediastinal carcinoma, and Castleman’s Disease, all rare tumours not covered elsewhere in the book
  • Literature is largely based on case reports and case series
  • Castleman’s disease is perhaps the most frequently seen of these rare mediastinal tumours in adults
  • There is no universally accepted classification system; however, we offer in Table 1 an attempt to unify and summarize the available information about this heterogeneous collection of lesions.
  • CT or MRI may be useful in diagnosis. However, tissue diagnosis is often required to make the definitive diagnosis.
  • Resection is the treatment of choice as chemotherapy and radiation are often not effective.
  • In occasional cases it is wise to onsider pre-operative embolization for some solitary fibrous tumors, hemangiomas and Castleman’s disease.
  • Prognosis is variable and dependent on histology and completeness of resection.

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Last updated: June 19, 2020