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Tracheal Resection

Robert E. Merritt, Douglas J. Mathisen
Tracheal Resection is a topic covered in the Pearson's General Thoracic.

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Key Points

  • Diseases of the trachea that require surgical resection and reconstruction include idiopathic tracheal stenosis, postintubation injuries, and primary tumors of the trachea.
  • Simple radiologic techniques without use of contrast medium will delineate most pathologic conditions of the trachea.
  • Bronchoscopy is invaluable in determining the extent of airway disease preoperatively.
  • Tracheal strictures need to be serially dilated with pediatric rigid bronchoscopes before endotracheal intubation.
  • Dissection of the trachea remains close to its lateral border to avoid injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerves.
  • The tracheal anastomosis is done with interrupted absorbable suture material (4-0 Vicryl).
  • Anastomotic tension is minimized by neck flexion and traction sutures (2-0 Vicryl).
  • A strap muscle flap is interposed between the tracheal anastomosis and the innominate artery.

-- To view the remaining sections of this topic, please or --

Key Points

  • Diseases of the trachea that require surgical resection and reconstruction include idiopathic tracheal stenosis, postintubation injuries, and primary tumors of the trachea.
  • Simple radiologic techniques without use of contrast medium will delineate most pathologic conditions of the trachea.
  • Bronchoscopy is invaluable in determining the extent of airway disease preoperatively.
  • Tracheal strictures need to be serially dilated with pediatric rigid bronchoscopes before endotracheal intubation.
  • Dissection of the trachea remains close to its lateral border to avoid injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerves.
  • The tracheal anastomosis is done with interrupted absorbable suture material (4-0 Vicryl).
  • Anastomotic tension is minimized by neck flexion and traction sutures (2-0 Vicryl).
  • A strap muscle flap is interposed between the tracheal anastomosis and the innominate artery.

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Last updated: December 4, 2019