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Interrupted Aortic Arch (IAA)

Jeremy L. Herrmann, MD, John W. Brown, MD
Interrupted Aortic Arch (IAA) is a topic covered in the Adult and Pediatric Cardiac.

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Embryology

The aortic arch can be anatomically sub-divided by embryological origin and adjacent brachiocephalic arteries. The proximal arch from innominate artery to left common carotid artery derives from the aortic sac; the distal arch from left common carotid artery to the left subclavian artery derives from the fourth embryonic arch; and the isthmus from distal arch to juxtaductal region from sixth embryonic arch. In "Interrupted Aortic Arch" (IAA), the interruption may occur as a result of pathologically excessive apoptosis of branchial arches and loss of patency and/or continuity of the relevant arch segment.[1]

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Embryology

The aortic arch can be anatomically sub-divided by embryological origin and adjacent brachiocephalic arteries. The proximal arch from innominate artery to left common carotid artery derives from the aortic sac; the distal arch from left common carotid artery to the left subclavian artery derives from the fourth embryonic arch; and the isthmus from distal arch to juxtaductal region from sixth embryonic arch. In "Interrupted Aortic Arch" (IAA), the interruption may occur as a result of pathologically excessive apoptosis of branchial arches and loss of patency and/or continuity of the relevant arch segment.[1]

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Last updated: August 27, 2021