Feedback

Unbalanced Atrioventricular (AV) Canal Defects

Viktoria H. Weixler, MD, Sitaram M. Emani, MD
Unbalanced Atrioventricular (AV) Canal Defects is a topic covered in the Adult and Pediatric Cardiac.

To view the entire topic, please or .

STS Cardiothoracic Surgery E-Book from The Society of Thoracic Surgeons provides expert guidance for Cardiac and Thoracic Surgery. Sections include Pearson’s General Thoracic, Esphageal, Adult Cardiac, and Pediatric and Congenital Cardiac Surgery. Explore these free sample topics:

-- The first section of this topic is shown below --

Introduction

Atrioventricular (AV) septal defects are described as a deficiency of the atrioventricular septum, varying from a simple ostium primum atrial septum defect (ASD I) to a complete AV septum/canal defect with a shared valve.[1],[2] Within the family of AV canal defects, also known as endocardial cushion defects, lies a subset of defects – termed unbalanced AV canal defects, which make up to 7–15% of all AV canal defects. The term “unbalanced” describes the abnormal location of the atrioventricular valve predominantly overlying one ventricle, with hypoplasia of the non-dominant ventricle.[3],[4][5] Surgical correction of unbalanced defects remain challenging and ranges from biventricular repair to univentricular palliation.[6]

-- To view the remaining sections of this topic, please or --

Introduction

Atrioventricular (AV) septal defects are described as a deficiency of the atrioventricular septum, varying from a simple ostium primum atrial septum defect (ASD I) to a complete AV septum/canal defect with a shared valve.[1],[2] Within the family of AV canal defects, also known as endocardial cushion defects, lies a subset of defects – termed unbalanced AV canal defects, which make up to 7–15% of all AV canal defects. The term “unbalanced” describes the abnormal location of the atrioventricular valve predominantly overlying one ventricle, with hypoplasia of the non-dominant ventricle.[3],[4][5] Surgical correction of unbalanced defects remain challenging and ranges from biventricular repair to univentricular palliation.[6]

There's more to see -- the rest of this entry is available only to subscribers.

Last updated: September 13, 2021