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Donor Management

Ronald Figura, Charles Fraser, Robert S. D. Higgins, Ahmet Kilic
Donor Management is a topic covered in the Adult and Pediatric Cardiac.

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Introduction

Heart transplantation continues to serve as the gold standard for end stage heart failure, with a median posttransplant survival of slightly greater than 10 years.[1] (Figure 1) Recently, the procedural and logistical evolution of heart transplantation has led to a resurgence of growth in the number of transplants performed annually. More than 3000 heart transplants were performed in 2016 in the United States.[2] Issues regarding donor selection and management as well as graft allocation have evolved. For instance, just approximately 20 years ago, as few as 45% of donor hearts that were offered, were ultimately transplanted.[3] Since then, techniques involving expansion of the donor pool with suboptimal donors, advancements in ex-vivo perfusion, and organ preservation strategies have grown significantly. Through the contemporary management of heart donors, including the donor pool and the donor allograft itself, the ultimate success and progression of heart transplantation can be achieved.

Figure 1
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Adult and Pediatric Heart Transplants (January 1982 – June 2015): Survival after transplant

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Introduction

Heart transplantation continues to serve as the gold standard for end stage heart failure, with a median posttransplant survival of slightly greater than 10 years.[1] (Figure 1) Recently, the procedural and logistical evolution of heart transplantation has led to a resurgence of growth in the number of transplants performed annually. More than 3000 heart transplants were performed in 2016 in the United States.[2] Issues regarding donor selection and management as well as graft allocation have evolved. For instance, just approximately 20 years ago, as few as 45% of donor hearts that were offered, were ultimately transplanted.[3] Since then, techniques involving expansion of the donor pool with suboptimal donors, advancements in ex-vivo perfusion, and organ preservation strategies have grown significantly. Through the contemporary management of heart donors, including the donor pool and the donor allograft itself, the ultimate success and progression of heart transplantation can be achieved.

Figure 1
Descriptive text is not available for this image
Adult and Pediatric Heart Transplants (January 1982 – June 2015): Survival after transplant

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Last updated: November 8, 2020